Planned Giving

Gift in Your Will (Planned Giving)

Leave a legacy to Food for Life Global. A gift in your will to Food for Life Global will help us save lives, by planning and exucuting vital projects far into the future. Together we can bring peace and prosperity to the world’s most needy for years and years to come. Many of our supporters make charitable gifts by naming Food for Life Global as a beneficiary in their wills. The United States federal government encourages these gifts or bequests, by allowing an unlimited estate tax charitable deduction.When you are making your Will there are several things to be considered, such as:
  • Making a list of your assets
  • Thinking about the way in which you want to divide your estate
  • Thinking about who to appoint as executor
It’s vital to review your Will regularly to ensure that it reflects your current wishes and circumstances. For instance, you may need to change your Will if you have got married, divorced, moved house or there has been a death of a friend or family member.

Types of Legacy

There are a few different kinds of gift you can leave in your Will. The most common are described below.

Residuary bequest

A gift of the remainder of the estate after all other bequests have been made and debts cleared is called a residuary bequest.

Pecuniary bequest

A gift of a fixed sum of money in your Will is called a pecuniary bequest. The value of pecuniary legacies will decrease over time, as the cost of living increases.

Specific bequest

A particular named item left as a gift in your Will is known as a specific bequest – for example, a piece of jewellery or plot of land.

Contingent bequest

A gift in your Will that depends upon the occurrence of an event which may or may not happen is known legally as a contingent bequest. An example is a bequest to a charity which applies only if other beneficiaries named in the Will die before the testator (person who made the Will).

Important Note

Food for Life Global would advise that anyone making or updating a Will should seek independent advice from a practising solicitor or bank trust company.

To learn more about Planned Giving (Bequests)

For advice on Planned Giving (Bequests), see: The National Committee on Planned Giving

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